Jeff Smith

The Power of Design in Recruiting Millennials

Design is a strategic weapon. If you want to recruit top Millennial talent, one of the best things you can do is give them communications that make them want to be where you are. Design can change people’s minds, make them take a second look, and maybe even look further into a company they didn’t think was a good fit.

It could all start with a brochure. Whether or not your recruiting collateral ends up in the trash or stays in the hands of a potential employee can depend on design. That brochure or flyer might be the potential candidate’s first encounter with your employer brand, so it’s important to make that first impression a strong one.

Millennials, in particular, will notice the design. This generation has been raised on powerful branding, and they’re a discerning audience. If the design of your recruitment materials looks second-rate, they’ll assume your company is a second-rate kind of place to work. If you want to convince potential candidates that your company is a leader in the industry, your recruitment communications need to reflect that caliber of design.

Millennials also have lots of questions. What does your company stand for? What do you offer? What’s the culture like? Although your copy might include answers to all of the above, people will also collect clues from the look and feel of your recruitment materials. Use design to transform your recruitment collateral into a conversation starter.

Millennials respond to authenticity. In addition to great design, it’s also important to be real. Show photography of actual employees, not stock photography of models. If your company is particularly innovative, the design should reflect that. If it’s a collaborative culture, show that. Give potential job candidates a visual feel for what your employer brand represents.

Interested in stronger recruiting communications? Tribe can help.

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Millennials hate the word Millennials — and now they hate Simon Sinek too

If you want to make someone bristle, pick anyone in their early 30s or younger and call them a Millennial. We Boomers don’t seem to have a big issue with our label, and I haven’t heard many Gen Xers complain, but there’s a widespread and deep frustration shared by Millennial employees when all 75 Million of them are lumped into one generic category.

A recent video of Simon Sinek has many of them understandably riled. In his talk on Millennials in the workplace, he seeks to answer what he calls the Millennial Question.

The reason Simon Sinek really struck a nerve is that his generalization is so negative. He doesn’t hold back in his portrayal of Millennial employees as the unfortunate result of poor parenting, social media, impatience and environment. He refers to their reputation for feeling entitled to things they haven’t worked for. (Nota bene: Entitlement is one of those words that is pretty much guaranteed to make Millennials flinch and/or grind their teeth.)

He does say it isn’t Millennials fault. If you keep watching past the part where he lists everything that’s wrong with Millennials, he makes some great points about organizational and behavioral changes that could benefit all of us, not just Millennials. But he’s certainly not making a case for Millennials being the best thing ever to happen to the workplace.

In the Huffington Post, Jared Buckley makes an argument for why Simon Sinek is wrong. Buckley resists the notion that one can generalize about an entire generation. He also suggests that the Millennial Question can best be answered by asking more specific questions that relate to your desired outcome. Do you want to attract more Millennials to your company? Do you want to help them develop their careers faster? Are you trying to understand how they like to work?

In some sense, answering the Millennial Question is a moot point. From technology to manufacturing to the service industry, they’re carrying a tremendous share of our collective workload. They’re filling the ranks of middle management. They’re starting their own companies in record numbers. One can’t dismiss the entire generation as a bunch of entry-level workers with no experience to offer.

Perhaps the issues Sinek cites are less about a generation and more about a life stage. Complaining about the follies of youth is not a new thing. When the Boomers were coming of age, their elders complained about “kids these days.” Even the ancient Greeks griped about the young ones. Socrates wrote, “Children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority, disrespect their elders, and love talking instead of exercise.”

Millennials are steadily aging out of one life stage and into another. Maybe it’s time to start complaining about the next generation.

Interested in better communication with the Millennials in your company? Tribe can help.

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Forget Millennials: It’s Time to Prepare for Gen Z Employees

Now that Millennials are hitting their 30s, it’s time to think about the generation that’s right on their heels. Generation Z, born between 1995 and 2002, is beginning to fill our entry level positions.

Competition for Gen Z employees will be fierce. As Gen Y continues to move up the org chart, there will be smaller numbers of Gen Z to replace them.

It’s time to prepare your company to recruit and retain Gen Z. While many workplaces are still adapting to accommodate Gen Y, the oldest among those employees are in their mid-30s. Rather than being entry-level employees, many of these Millennials are now somebody’s boss.

Gen Z employees have never lived in a world without the Internet. Technology is so indigenous to their life, it’s like breathing air to them. They don’t even notice it’s there, unless it’s not.

Here’s what us Boomers may find counterintuitive about Gen Z and technology. We came of age in a world where Joni Mitchell lamented that they’d “paved paradise and put up a parking lot.” While we grew up thinking of technology as cold and inhuman, Gen Z finds this attitude (to use a phrase Gen Z would use only ironically) completely wack.

Gen Z uses technology to express their humanness. They depend on technology to build relationships, to collaborate, and to bring creative ideas to life. They use technology to be continuously learning and to find solutions to problems.

 All of the above are qualities of highly engaged employees. If one of the key roles of internal communications is to reduce barriers to employee effectiveness, then we better get ready to provide Gen Z with all the technology tools and channels they could possibly want.

Gen Z is ready to change the world. And their tool of choice in technology. When Tribe interviewed Gen Z kids in 2010, they were extremely confident in their abilities to solve problems of both the marketplace and the planet.

“Technology will make it much easier,” said a 14-year-old respondent who’s now in college at University of Pennsylvania. “I think technology will advance enough that environmental issues will be something that can be solved. Like energy needs can be solved. We’ll have easy ways to make energy. Then we can move on to things like world hunger.”

By all means, let’s get them going on those issues. Interested in increasing your company’s strength in attracting and keeping Gen Z employees? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Internal Communications: The 9 to 5 and what’s next

HiRes

Back in the early 1900s, Economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by 2030, most of the workforce would be clocking less than 15 hours a week. We are still a long way from such efficient standards, but 100 years ago, the 9 to 5 was still a relatively fresh concept. The notion of this schedule in the American workplace wouldn’t become the standard until the unprecedented effects of Henry Ford’s assembly line manufacturing and FDR’s New Deal had reached every corner of the country, with much of the globe following suit.

Keynes must have foreseen the affects of globalization, Millennials and an increasingly socially progressive society. The world is smaller; videoconferencing has changed the meaning of a centralized workforce; freelancing and self-employment are on the rise, as is mandatory vacation and maternity/paternity leave. Millennials are demanding more flexible work schedules and research on sleep and the difference between early- and late-risers is justifying their cause. How can a company communicate effectively with all these factors considered? What happened to the days of every employee at his or her desk by 9 am?

The concept of 9 to 5, a defining corporate characteristic that every single person living today has known since birth, is actually just a stop on the highly fluid track of industrial development. Internal communications might be viewed with the same big-picture perspective, evolving to match the needs of the times. New channels and technologies will be vetted for usefulness and their executions measured in order to draw key insights. No one wants to be the company known for ignoring the next big thing (see: Kodak).

The constant need to evolve applies to messaging as well. Millennial priorities are different from that of the generations before them, and the generations to follow will define their own. It would have seemed silly to boast about efforts to be more environmentally responsible as a corporation or encourage employees to exercise through fitness competitions only a couple decades ago. These are not efforts that are obviously connected to an increase in productivity, but through trial, error and due diligence, companies all over the world are unlocking the cheat codes to efficient communications and an engaged workforce. In a universe like our own where everything is in a constant state of fluidity, it would make sense that your communications would be as well.

Are you interested in evolving your communications? Tribe can help.

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Who wants what: Life stages and the EVP

The employee value proposition helps employees see beyond compensation and benefits to the larger picture. Although there are other elements of the EVP that attract top talent and keep your best employees in place, it’s safe to say all employees care about their pay and insurance.

Beyond that, many elements of the EVP will be different for each individual. Some people are looking for a company where they can enjoy a better work-life balance.  Other employees might secretly enjoy racking up air miles and staying in hotels all over the world. Some folks want to be able to wear T-shirts and flip flops to the office. Hourly workers in positions that don’t promise much career advancement might appreciate tuition assistance to get that college degree.

Although we can’t assume that diverse personalities will want the same things, people in certain life stages often want similar perks. New parents might particularly value the options of flex time or working from home. Those in the early stages of their careers will likely be looking for a company with a great deal of opportunity for growth. Although Gen Y employees often rank meaningful work high on their lists, that factor can also be a big deal to many Boomers.

The EVP provides answers to the employee’s question, “What’s in it for me?” It’s wise to remember, however, that the right answers will be different according to what any individual employee values most in life.

Ready to explore your employee value proposition? Tribe can help.

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Flexible work hours and remote work can increase retention and productivity

Are 9 to 5 workdays in assigned cubicles becoming a thing of the past? A recent study by Luxembourg-based Regus indicates that 81 percent of companies worldwide are offering their employees alternatives to fixed office working. Flexible working, as Regus defines it, includes allowing employees some freedom in setting their hours, the ability to work at alternate locations rather than in the office, and the possibility of part-time or freelance work as opposed to full-time employment.

The Regus study also reports higher productivity and profitability in companies with flexible working arrangements. “ The majority (72%) of global businesses report that increased productivity is a direct result of flexible working practices. In almost all cases (68%) firms declare that flexible working has led to staff generating more revenue.” I’m not sure I’d call 68 percent “almost all,” but the data is interesting.

Intuitively, it makes sense that flexible work arrangements will help attract and retain employees. Millennials, in particular, value quality of life over many other variables, and having flexibility is certainly more conducive to balancing work and life. As Boomers retire, companies will need more Millennials to fill the pipeline of promotable talent.

Millennial mothers will also expect more flexibility in their employment options. With Boomers and Gen X women, companies have experienced a brain drain in their middle management layers as women withdraw from the workforce after they have children. The generation of women following them will be less likely to accept the idea that parenting and working are mutually exclusive.

Technology is one reason they’ll be able to pull it off. This generation has a strong tendency towards a more porous divider between work and personal life. They don’t mind answering work emails while they’re out with friends, but they also will be checking their personal social media accounts at work. They’re accustomed to communicating on the move and take for granted that they don’t have to be sitting in front of a computer to get things done.

Even their older colleagues have figured out how to keep work moving when they’re out of the office. Stop by any after-school soccer game, lacrosse match or equestrian event and you’ll see parents taking conference calls and responding to emails from their seat in the stands.

Interested in building employee engagement through flexible work? Tribe can help.

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Internal communications for Gen Z: Give them their technology already

What comes after X and Y? Generation Z, born between 1995 and 2002, is just beginning to enter the workplace.

Competition for Gen Z employees will be fierce. As Gen Y continues to move up the org chart, there will be smaller numbers of Gen Z to replace them.

It’s time to prepare your company to recruit and retain Gen Z. While many workplaces are still adapting to accommodate Gen Y, the oldest among those employees are in their mid-30s. Rather than being entry-level employees, many of these Millennials are now somebody’s boss.

Gen Z employees have never lived in a world without the Internet. Technology is so indigenous to their life, it’s like breathing air to them. They don’t even notice it’s there, unless it’s not.

Here’s what us Boomers may find counterintuitive about Gen Z and technology. We came of age in a world where Joni Mitchell lamented that they’d “paved paradise and put up a parking lot.” While we grew up thinking of technology as cold and inhuman, Gen Z finds this attitude (to use a phrase Gen Z would use only ironically) completely wack.

Gen Z uses technology to express their humanness. They depend on technology to build relationships, to collaborate, and to bring creative ideas to life. They use technology to be continuously learning and to find solutions to problems.

 All of the above are qualities of highly engaged employees. If one of the key roles of internal communications is to reduce barriers to employee effectiveness, then we better get ready to provide Gen Z with all the technology tools and channels they could possibly want.

Gen Z is ready to change the world. And their tool of choice in technology. When Tribe interviewed Gen Z kids in 2010, they were extremely confident in their abilities to solve problems of both the marketplace and the planet.

“Technology will make it much easier,” said a 14-year-old respondent who’s now in college at University of Pennsylvania. “I think technology will advance enough that environmental issues will be something that can be solved. Like energy needs can be solved. We’ll have easy ways to make energy. Then we can move on to things like world hunger.”

By all means, let’s get them going on those issues. Interested in increasing your company’s strength in attracting and keeping Gen Z employees? Tribe can help.

 

Millennials in the workforce: strengths and weaknesses

As each year goes by, more and more millennials fill up the job market. This growing generation is met with a variety of opinions and stereotypes while they enter the workforce. Some of those opinions and stereotypes are right on the money, some not so much. Forbes recently published this article on a study which reveals some insights about Millennials in the workplace.

Millennials, or Generation Y, are often seen as over-confident, stubborn, entitled, unprepared and lazy. Yes, Gen Y may approach problems and projects differently than Boomers and Generation X might but this shouldn’t be seen as over-confidence or stubbornness. Gen Y is focused on getting the job done and if they can complete a project in a more efficient way, they’ll do it. The downside to this is that if there are structures and processes in place in your organization, Gen X and the Boomers often frown on breaking out of the mold. The key to managing a situation like this is to recognize if the structure that’s set in place is compatible with the person working within that structure.

The internet is as much a part of Gen Y’s daily routine as brushing their teeth. They look at smartphones, tablets, laptops the same way boomers and Gen X look at pen and paper. Gen Y has been developing talents, specifically with technology, since the day they were born. These technologies are being implemented into the business cycle more often. Every day, some new platform, channel, or app is invented and Gen Y has the fundamentals to adapt to it immediately.

Many companies leave social media to the interns and associate level employees. This is probably because social media’s value isn’t seen and partly because Boomers and Gen X don’t see channels like Facebook or Twitter as a tool. Or in some cases, older employees may not be comfortable with the technology.

Gen Y grew up immersing themselves in these various social media sites, learning and adapting to their constantly changing functions. There may come a time in your organization where you rely heavily on social media to interact with customers, vendors, team members, etc. If and when that time comes, you might be happy to have those interns in your back pocket that know a thing or two about increasing online engagement.

That being said, Gen Y has a lot to learn from the Boomers and Gen X. This is one way Gen Y fits its stereotype. Millennials tend to channel their over-confidence and eagerness into disregarding advice from senior employees when they don’t see the point. They may need help understanding that most of the time Boomer and Gen X make decisions based on their many years of experience.

Interested in attracting and retaining Millennial talent? Tribe can help.