Jeff Smith

Employee Communications: When stock photography is a bad idea

 

Think before you search. We all know how easy it can be to search Google or iStock and try to find the perfect picture to represent your office culture or even your employees. But nothing is more representative of employees, than searching through a library of actual employees in the actual environment they work in every day. Stock photography is cheap and easy, but it’s not always a great idea.

In this day and age, authenticity is huge. People are able to tell you exactly what’s authentic and what’s not and they may even be deterred from viewing something if they deem it unauthentic. People can spot a model a mile away, and when you try to use stock models to represent real employees, you’re not fooling anyone. That brings us to the top three reasons for shooting original photography. All three of the following benefits make it worth considering the effort and expense of original photography.

1. Building engagement. When it comes to internal communications, we always want the employees to feel engaged, and there’s nothing more engaging than seeing your best friend in the newest issue of the magazine, or on an email, or on digital signage. Chances are, if an employee sees that there are actual photos of real people in the real work environment, there’s a better chance they may engage with that publication, email, or whatever it may be.

2. Creating celebrities. Our culture is fascinated with celebrities, and when you use photographs of real employees, some of that show biz stardust falls on each of those individuals. Some of the time, the employees that work the hardest jobs, don’t necessarily get the most recognition. Shooting original photography gives those employees that are hidden, a face and really brings authenticity to the company.

 3. Connecting employees. One of the best ways to break down silos is to help employees develop human connections with the people in other silos. When you’re able to put a face on a colleague, whether that person is in manufacturing or at headquarters, you humanize them. The ability for someone in retail to see a photo of another colleague in manufacturing building something that they sell, connects those silos. Besides, employees love looking at photos of each other. It’s nice to see who works where and what they do.

 Interested in photographing your employees? Tribe can help.

Photograph provided by Chris Davis Photography // cdphoto.com

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

5 Ways to Recognize the Employees Who Do the Real Work of the Company

Photo credit: Chris Davis Photography

Giving visibility to leadership is important. People want to see the faces and know the humans behind the titles at the top of the org chart.

But it can be even more powerful to give visibility to the people in the rest of the organization. Unwittingly, internal communications often focus on the folks at the top and don’t give much coverage to the employees who are manufacturing the products; delivering the service; making the sales; coding the platforms — not to mention all the employees in HR, accounting, marketing and more who support all those people.

Here are five ways to create more visibility for the people doing the real work of the company:

  1. Quote them in articles: On the intranet or in your employee publications, use regular employees as sources rather than always quoting someone from the C-suite. When you’re covering a new product or a new plant, giving examples of collaboration or innovation, illustrating how the values of the company are used at work, the rank-and-file people will have insights and comments that other employees will be interested to read.
  2. Shoot employee photography: I’m not talking about snapping someone’s headshot standing against a beige cubicle wall. Invest in talented photographers to shoot employees in context of their work. Then use that library of employee photography to illustrate everything from your intranet to digital signage to the annual report. If you have a number of locations and types of workplaces, try shooting at three to five places a year and building the library over time.
  3. Build an employee culture team: Establish a small group of mid-level employees who represent diversity across the company, and task them with being conduits for the culture. You might start with an off-site where the team can bond, and have leadership join to talk about the culture, where they company is going, what it is the company stands for. Then use this team to give culture presentations to their colleagues and to report back to leadership on employee questions and concerns, progress and set-backs. When you have a major change down the road, you’ll be glad to have this community of peer influencers already in place.
  4. Create a peer-to-peer recognition program: Top-down recognition is great, but it can be just as powerful to be recognized by one’s coworkers. Establish a monthly or quarterly recognition program in which employees drive the process of who amongst them gets recognized.
  5. Help them see the value of their roles: This is the big one — and lies at the heart of employees feeling celebrated rather than invisible. If you can draw a line, in employees’ minds, that leads directly from what they do every day to the vision and success of the company, you create a powerful shift. Help employees see how their individual roles contribute, and make sure they see leadership recognizing their contributions as well.

Interested in giving your employees more visibility? Tribe can help.

 

 

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

Three Reasons to Shoot Your Employees

Stock photography is cheap and easy, but it’s not always a great idea. In certain situations, of course, it can be a good solution. When you want to communicate a concept, like collaboration or growth, you might use symbolic or metaphorical photography. If you want a simple visual to illustrate a topic like the 401K, you can find tons of nice shots of piggy banks or gold coins or other relevant objects.

But don’t use stock to represent your employees. It instantly communicates inauthenticity, but even more important, it’s forgoing a fantastic opportunity to build engagement.

Let’s start with the inauthentic part. People can spot a model a mile away. When you use stock in employee communications — to represent real employees — you’re not fooling anyone. Everybody knows those aren’t really employees on the intranet or in the brochure or wherever you’re using stock photos.

Then consider what happens when you photograph actual employees. All three of the following benefits make it worth considering the effort and expense of original photography.

1. Making heroes of your employees: Our culture is fascinated with celebrities, and when you use photographs of real employees, some of that show biz stardust falls on each of those individuals. But like a pebble in a pond, a heroic shot of one employee also creates a sense of pride for all those other employees out there who can look at that photo and say, “Hey, that person is just like me.”

2. Connecting employees across silos: One of the best ways to break down silos is to help employees develop human connections with the people in other silos. When you can put a face on a colleague, whether that person is down the hall or across the globe, you humanize them. Besides, employees love looking at photos of each other. Employee photos consistently get positive responses in all sorts of internal communications. If you’re creating a library of employee photography, or shooting numerous photos for a large project like a vision book, try to include as many silos as possible. Try also to cover a diversity of job function, seniority levels, ethnic backgrounds, age and gender.

3. The shoot itself builds engagement. When you have a professional photographer in the building — along with the accompanying lights, cameras and makeup stylists — it creates excitement. Employees want to know what’s going on, they want to be involved, and they will tell everybody they know about the shoot at work. Create more assets to use in internal comms with “behind the scenes” photos of the shoot in progress. Get shots of employees in the makeup chair, the photographer working with his subjects, the glamour of a working set. Those BTS photos are sometimes even more engaging than the professional shots by the real photographer.

Interested in the possibilities of employee photography in your organization?Tribe can help.

 

Elizabeth Cogswell Baskin

3 reasons to shoot your employees: Or, when stock photos are a bad idea

In many situations, stock photography can be a great solution. It’s a cost effective and easy way to provide visuals for a multitude of communication materials.

But don’t use stock to represent your employees. It instantly communicates inauthenticity, but even more important, it’s forgoing a fantastic opportunity to build engagement.

Let’s start with the inauthentic part. People can spot a model a mile away. When you use stock in employee communications — to represent real employees — you’re not fooling anyone. Everybody knows those aren’t really employees on the intranet or in the brochure or wherever you’re using stock photos.*

Then consider what happens when you photograph actual employees. All three of the following benefits make it worth considering the effort and expense of original photography.

1. Making heroes of your employees: Our culture is fascinated with celebrities, and when you use photographs of real employees, some of that show biz stardust falls on each of those individuals. But like a pebble in a pond, a heroic shot of one employee also creates a sense of pride for all those other employees out there who can look at that photo and say, “Hey, that person is just like me.”

2. Connecting employees across silos: One of the best ways to break down silos is to help employees develop human connections with the people in other silos. When you can put a face on a colleague, whether that person is down the hall or across the globe, you humanize them. Besides, employees love looking at photos of each other. Employee photos consistently get positive response in all sorts of internal communications. If you’re creating a library of employee photography, or shooting numerous photos for a large project like a vision book, try to include as many silos as possible. Try also to cover a diversity of job function, seniority levels, ethnic backgrounds, age and gender.

3. The shoot itself builds engagement. When you have a professional photographer in the building — along with the accompanying lights, cameras and makeup stylists — it creates excitement. Employees want to know what’s going on, they want to be involved, and they will tell everybody they know about the shoot at work. Create more assets to use in internal comms with “behind the scenes” photos of the shoot in progress. Get shots of employees in the makeup chair, the photographer working with his subjects, the glamour of a working set. Those BTS photos are sometimes even more engaging than the professional shots by the real photographer.

Interested in the possibilities of employee photography in your organization?Tribe can help.

* Full disclosure: Tribe once put employee Stephen Burn’s head on a stock photo guy’s body, until we could get a full-body shot of him to match the other Tribe bio shots. Stephen did not like it much.