Nick Miller

Employee Engagement: Training & Development can lead to higher employee retention

Professional development programs can be a key element in employee retention. From a company perspective, training and development programs are meant to improve overall performance. But a well-designed program can do just as much for the employee. By providing employees an avenue through which to build upon their skills, it shows them the company has a vested interest in them as individuals, decreasing the likelihood that they’ll take those talents elsewhere.

The type of individual to partake in career development programs is one who welcomes more engagement. Take advantage of this desire to learn. By engaging this group in a meaningful way, they are likely to communicate these opportunities to employees that may not seek them out on their own. It’s a win-win situation for both the company and the employee base by increasing engagement levels. An engaged workforce is a happy workforce, and this too decreases the turnover rate.

Of course, it’s also important to ensure that training programs themselves are engaging. It will be hard for an employee to see the benefits of training if the material isn’t meaningful, or if the presentation is boring or poorly organized. The first step is to make the training materials and format appealing and motivating, while not coming across as cheesy or self-serving.

Communicate the “why.” Employees need to know that the time taken away from their regularly scheduled jobs is for a purpose. If they know up front what the training will entail and how it will improve their day-to-day operation or advance their career, they will be much more likely to see it as an opportunity rather than an obligation.

Bake in your corporate vision and values. The opportunity to get your brightest workers in one room with the hunger for learning doesn’t happen every day. Take advantage by reinforcing what is most important to your organization. By illustrating their role in the big picture, you are creating internal brand ambassadors, whether they know it or not. This too will increase engagement, and thus increase retention.

Structure your program to create a feedback loop. These are the leaders in your workforce, and they are a valuable source of information. Tap into this wealth by providing them a channel to express their opinions, not just on the development program, but the operations of your company. Show them that their voices are important and act on their suggestions. If they understand that their perspectives are valued, it will only benefit the organization.

Need help developing an engaging training program? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Employee Engagement in an Age of Uncertainty

For the first time since 2012, global employee engagement took a negative turn in 2016. A study recently published by Aon shows that 2016 saw a -2% drop in employee engagement, following significant advances across the globe since the start of the decade. Trends vary by continent, with Asia experiencing the biggest drop at -3% and Latin America experiencing an increase of 3%. Countries within each continent vary as well, with the Philippines trending downward the most at -9% and Nigeria trending upward at 9%.

Across the world, 2016 was a year of discord. Few of the world’s leading countries avoided some major conflict or uncertainty, whether it’s in the form of terror attacks, elections with rising populist sentiments, effects of Brexit, or the weight of refugee resettlement. There’s no doubt that people all over the world have faced the difficult realities of a changing landscape with concern, but so have the companies that comprise the global economy.

So, the question is: Is the effect of these concerning distractions causing employees to be less engaged at work, or are organizations allocating less resources to engagement and communications in a time of uncertainty?

It doesn’t appear there is a clear answer. For example, both the United States and the United Kingdom experienced divisive national campaigns that captured the airwaves for many months. The U.S. experienced a slight drop in engagement, but the U.K.’s overall engagement increased a point. Another great example is Brazil, which experienced a year of both significant economic and political conflict, impeaching their president and decreasing their GDP by -4%. Yet their employee engagement increased more than any other country besides Nigeria.

Regardless of cause or correlation, insights can be drawn. Employees are a company’s greatest asset. In a year like 2016 where events outside of work cause your workforce to feel unsettled, having leaders overly engage employees can ease any negative feelings related to work.

By making their jobs the least uncertain aspect of their lives, you’re doing them a favor that pays off for both the individual and the organization. If your company is going through major change, out-performing last year’s numbers, or just at status quo, keeping your employees in the loop and communicating their role in the company’s mission will always yield positive results.

Are you interested in increasing your employee engagement measurements? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Employee Engagement: Engraining recognition into your corporate culture

Communicating appreciation in the workplace, both top-down and peer-to-peer, is critical to building engagement. A simple “thank you” or “job well done” can often hold the same value to an employee as a monetary reward. Creating a culture of appreciation will let your employees feel valued and know that their efforts are appreciated, but it is something that happens over time and involves all levels of employees.

It starts at the top. Regardless of the type of culture a company is trying to create, leadership sets the tone for the entire organization. Culture cascades through the organization just like tangible communications, so appreciative behavior is likely to be mimicked as employees observe their managers. From there, they set the example for the next level of employees and this trickledown effect permeates throughout all employee groups.

Change how employees view recognition. Many companies make the mistake of treating recognition programs as a box to check without considering the requirements of keeping the program fresh, effective and sustainable. Launching a recognition initiative should be strategic in order to ensure that associates aren’t jaded by “just another program” that falls by the wayside. You might tie recognition to the company values or other objectives that you want to reinforce over the long haul.

Consider using perks to encourage recognition. Intranets and microsites are great solutions to track who is being recognized and why. We at Tribe promote gamification of your recognition program, such as points-based systems that can translate into giveaways or drawings. Engagement for programs like these are often higher – as it’s hard to beat free stuff.

Publicize recognition to the whole company. Part of fostering recognition within your corporate culture is to communicate it to everyone. Take specific examples and print them on posters, post them on digital signage or include them in your newsletter. Employees value seeing their peers recognized on a broad scale and will use the indirect appreciation as motivation to be the next one. Make sure to spotlight all levels of employees – down to the part-time, hourly workers. In doing so, you’re promoting equality and inclusion, key aspects of an appreciative culture.

Interested in showing your employees how much they mean to your company? Tribe can help.

 

Nick Miller

Internal Communications Lessons from United Airlines

How should a PR crisis be communicated to employees? The United Airlines debacle this week has caused quite a stir across the globe, damaging the company’s stock and causing a loss of market capitalization in the billions of dollars. But this event is certain to have repercussions internally as well. While we don’t have an insider’s view of how UA has approached their communications to employees, we can infer quite a lot from their public relations strategy.

“We can afford to lose money – even a lot of money. But we can’t afford to lose reputation – even a shred of reputation.” This quote, penned by Warren Buffet in a memo to managers of Berkshire Hathaway, comes to mind whenever a large enterprise commits a major PR blunder such as UA’s. Buffet understands the concept of atoning for a mistake as opposed to justifying clearly wrong behavior, as his fortune and repute were on the brink during a scandal with his former company Salomon Brothers.

But Buffet’s counsel is not only relevant to public relations. A number of internal communications lessons can be drawn from this philosophy and the loads of examples of what happens when it isn’t adhered to. Consider the following tips on communicating to employees following an internal crisis in order to maintain your company’s reputation among the workforce and avoid as much internal damage as possible.

  1. Be on time with your communications. The longer it takes to inform your employees on the actual happenings of a crisis, the more time you give the court of public opinion to shape their own judgement. Buffet pens in the same memo that bad news can always been handled, but undesirable situations are made worse once the news has “festered for awhile.” Squash the rumor mill before it begins to churn by being straightforward and transparent about your internal crisis.
  1. Even though action must be swift, consider all angles before deciding how to communicate. This may seem obvious, but in the heat of a crisis it is easy to make a move you think is correct without deliberating each outcome. The end goal is for employees to feel like the situation is being handled correctly, not to think to themselves, “what were they thinking?”
  1. Don’t blame the victim. If an employee is affected by an internal crisis, coming to work is no longer a positive experience. Placing fault on an employee(s) that is not responsible magnifies the negativity tenfold. Once that loyalty to a company is damaged, there is no telling how long it can take to gain it back, if ever. This goes for employees on the sidelines as well, who are watching how their fellow associates are being treated and are wondering how long it will be until they’re next.
  1. Lastly, don’t let your apologies fall short of what is appropriate. Accept responsibility and apologize for the actual offense, as opposed to conditional or incomplete apologies. Take the opportunity to put a positive spin on your message. Include improvements in your statement and elaborate on how those changes will be reinforced. Give your employees the confidence that, while a misstep may have been made, it is being dealt with competently and will not be repeated.

Need help managing your internal communications during a crisis? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Employee Engagement: Communicating corporate values

Start by identifying values that are easy to understand and remember. It is a formidable task to take a leader’s vision for the company and narrow it down to a few words employees should use to guide their efforts. On the flip side, if you want employees to truly adopt the company’s values, they need to be able to remember them and easily discuss their meanings. At Tribe, we recommend no more than three to five values written in language a third grader would understand.

Target recurring occasions and communications to acquaint and connect your workforce to your values. Values shouldn’t live exclusively on the poster on the break room wall. When planning any communications calendar, think of opportunities to incorporate the values into existing internal communication pieces, company events or programs. Rotate your values as the themes of your newsletter content or publish value-focused blogs and leadership videos. We especially like desktop tchotchkes such as Legos that reinforce values while also giving employees something to tinker with while working. The more instances your workforce happens upon corporate values, the better.

Designate values champions throughout the organization. Review your organization chart and identify middle-level managers in each department who have a passion for and exemplify the values. Charge them with ensuring the values are included in internal communication pieces, events and programs. Ask them to recognize other employees who are using or living the values and highlight those associates as heroes of the business. Involve your champions in the gap evaluation process of the values and reward them for the extra work and commitment they are giving to the company.

Integrate the values into your hiring and employee evaluation process. It is easy to say that your values are integral to your company’s success but to show employees the true importance you place on them, they should be included in the hiring and evaluation process. Include values-based questions during the interview as well as a checklist for hiring managers to use to ensure a prospect exemplifies them. A pre-boarding package that introduces values prior to an employee’s start date allows them to feel familiar with the values before their first hour is logged. It can also communicate that company values are of equal importance as other included elements, such as corporate policy. Incorporating your values into your evaluation process will both fortify the significance of values and offer supervisors the opportunity to coach an individual on how they can better employ those values within their work.

Looking to communicate corporate values to your employees? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Be the source of information your workforce can trust


The world experienced a global erosion of trust in their traditional sources of information in 2016.
The rise of fake news, alternative facts, and echo chambers, whether it be partisan press or social media, has hindered factual information from being treated as such.

The consequences of a workforce that is, by default, skeptical of information has wide ranging implications to your company. Ensuring your internal communications are excluded from such doubt of validity could be a difficult, but necessary, undertaking.

The good news is that, as an employer, you already have a foundation of trust to build upon. The 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer, an annual analysis of global trust in organizations, paints a positive picture for the influence of business. Business, as an institution, experienced the least significant degradation in trust by percentage, over government, media, and NGOs. According to Edelman’s study, three out of four people agree that a company “can take specific actions that can both increase profits and improve the economic and social conditions in the community where it operates.”

But business is not entirely in the clear, and must act in order to retain their favorable position. Globalization and wildly unbalanced financial gain of executives are common sources of fear and distrust among the workforce. Edelman’s study has also uncovered a corrosion of trust in experts, regardless of field, with CEO credibility decreasing the most in the past year, dropping to an all-time low. Peer-to-peer communication is considered most credible as people seem to be most comfortable with a spokesperson that is akin to themselves.

A number of conclusions can be drawn for internal communications. One of Tribe’s takeaways is that, now more than ever, corporate communications are most effective when it is communicated in a manner that makes all employees feel like they have the most accurate and current information about the company. That means giving the business reasons behind a major organizational change, for instance. It also means sharing numbers, whether you’re discussing the engagement survey or financial results.

Interested in maintaining the credibility of your internal communications? Tribe can help.

 

Nick Miller

Change Management: Four Tips to Communicate Bad News Best

Yellow road sign saying changes ahead with blue cloudy skyHeraclitus said “Change is the only constant in life,” and that applies as much to a company as any individual. Stagnation will smother a company’s success and so change should be celebrated as a part of the corporate life cycle. But sometimes change can be bad news to members of your workforce.

That doesn’t mean they don’t want to be informed. It’s the obligation of a business to keep their employees up-to-date on news that can affect their daily lives. In those instances, leadership is given the opportunity to communicate change respectively.

Here are five best practices for communicating with employees during tough times in a manner that helps employees get the right message for how to move forward:

  1. Focus on what you can impact. In other words, don’t waste precious time on things you can’t control. As much as you’d like to, you can’t dictate someone’s response to a message, nor do you have the luxury of changing the message to suit each individual. The most sensible and kind way to handle difficult communications is to deliver messages and news in an appropriate and timely manner.
  2. It’s about tone. It’s tough to deliver bad news one day and then follow with neutral or even positive news the next, but that is essential for a healthy communications team. It’s as detrimental to dwell on the hard decisions made yesterday as it is to rest on your laurels. Think of a newscaster whose job it is to report on a tragedy and then talk about a random act of kindness. Changing your tone accordingly is part of the job.
  3. Have a post-announcement plan. If you’re communications plan stops after the message is delivered, you can lose control of how that message evolves. Plan one or multiple follow up messages in order to combat the rumor mill. Initiate checkpoints to gauge how it’s going and invite feedback. Employees will feel more engaged if you involve them in the process.
  4. Don’t be surprised if employees think change is bad. If you’re not properly prepared for a negative response, it can come across as though your employees’ feelings were not factored in. Acknowledge that the news is unfortunate, but it is a part of the business process.

Need help communicating change to your employees? Tribe can help.

 

Nick Miller

Manager Communications: Coaching managers to engage employees

Coaching managers to empower and positively interact with their subordinates leads to higher morale, and therefore increased productivity and positive intention rates. Teaching managers to give their employees the freedom to make decisions also allows them to grow, resulting in a generation of future leaders. Here are four ways to increase the empowerment level of employees within your company:

  1. Encourage employees to take ownership of their jobs. Properly engaged employees will approach their job like they are working for their own company. When people take ownership of a job, they work with a higher level of dedication and deliver solid results. This also allows employees to take ownership of their mistakes, a very important step in professional growth.
  2. Don’t be a micromanager. A level of trust should be established that allows for an honest relationship with your employees. When people are trusted to do the job they are assigned to do, they generally rise to the occasion, increase performance levels and develop more respect for their leadership. Employees who are aware that a supervisor is constantly looking over their shoulder are much less likely to maintain high morale and will feel discouraged from offering their own ideas, both of which are detrimental to company growth.
  3. Present expectations clearly. When employee expectations are plainly presented, they are able to relax and focus their energy on the tasks at hand. Clear and established expectations between employee and employer allow people to not waste time worrying about job security or second-guessing their decisions.
  4. Balance coaching with listening. Creating an environment that allows people to share their opinions benefits the company as a whole. When leaders and employees are able to enter into a dialog, that is part listening and part coaching, both parties are able to educate themselves on the intricacies of the project and discover new solutions.

Are you interested in helping mangers engage employees? Tribe can help.

Nick Miller

Keeping Employees in the Loop: 3 channels to supplement your stagnant intranet

If you frequent blogs and newsfeeds that specialize in internal communications, chances are you’ve come across an article or two that put your intranet to shame. Ideally, the significance of a corporation’s information hub would be enough to gather funding for a makeover. But not every company has the resources to build or renovate an intranet to be that beacon of collaboration and conversation that some companies have the luxury of operating. So for now, here are a couple of channels that provide some of the benefits of an up-to-the-minute intranet:

  1. WordPress
    We have worked with a variety of clients that use WordPress sites either as a primary intranet or as a microsite used to announce internal brand launches or major change initiatives. The interface is relatively easy to use, allowing communications and HR departments the ability to develop a site with minimal programming experience or consulting. WordPress offers apps that make it mobile responsive and can be password protected, though we advise clients not to upload information that shouldn’t exist outside of a firewall. The beauty of WordPress is that it is scalable to whatever size or complexity suits your needs. It only requires some familiarity and a little imagination. One tip to keep in mind: you’ll want the WordPress.org version of the software so that you can apply your own company branding.
  2. Blogging App
    In our national research, we’ve found employees are more willing to use their personal mobile devices for company communications when it means downloading an app rather than sharing their phone number. If you are able to regularly secure blog posts from your leaders, posting a handful a week on one of a number of available apps can create an authentic two-way communication channel where employees can post comments and questions.
  3. Digital Signage
    Assuming your work environment has TV screens available, this is a simple, economic channel to keep topics top of mind, ranging from company news to culture and values. While they’re waiting for the elevator or in line at the company cafeteria, they can get bite-sized information to keep them in the loop. Plus, you omit the hurdle of building traffic to your site, since the traffic walks right by every day.

Want to explore alternatives to your stagnant or non-existent intranet? Tribe can help.