Brittany Walker

Does Your Culture Support New Moms?

Brittany had planned to post a blog today on best practices in workplace lactation rooms — covering the issues that are important to breastfeeding mothers and how companies can best accommodate their needs, as well as the importance of a culture that offers the flexibility to make it easier for women to return to …

BUT SHE WENT INTO LABOR BEFORE POSTING!

Want to stay in the loop? See Tribe’s Facebook page for the latest news.

Brittany Walker

3 Tips for Making Digital Communications More Engaging

The landscape of digital communications is continuously evolving. When it comes to engagement, thinking strategically and creatively will make all the difference. Here are three tips to thoughtfully increase engagement through your digital channels.

  1. Keep it short and to the point. We’re not saying that text-heavy channels can’t have a place in your IC arsenal, but communications consumed on-screen should generally be concise and direct. Whether you’re revamping your intranet, introducing digital signage or updating your corporate email strategy, a big differentiator in reaching employees in a meaningful way is to mirror the digital consumption trends they experience in their personal lives. Think bite-sized, easy-to-consume information, with a direct call-to-action to learn more.
  1. Shine the spotlight on employees. Make heroes of the people behind the hard work though employee spotlights. Simply put, employees love reading about other employees. Spotlights are a great way to feature frontline and field workers and celebrate their contributions, through regular Q&A’s in a newsletter, online recognition programs or contests that highlight employee performance. Spotlights also succeed at humanizing leadership by giving them a venue to share their vision and expertise.
  1. Make it move. From professionally produced videography, to quick-hit smart phone videos, to two-second GIFs, switching out still pictures for their moving counterparts can automatically enhance the employee experience. Video can be a great tool for engaging employees and breaking down silos because it truly gives an authentic face to employees and leadership alike, which is difficult to capture through picture or text alone. For a cost-effective solution for high-quality video, prepare material for eight to ten videos that can be shot in one day. If shooting leadership, we generally ask for 45 minutes on the CEO’s calendar and less than 30 minutes with other members of the executive team.

Need help with your digital communications strategy? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

Tribe’s Take on France’s “Right to Disconnect” from Email

Will corporate culture trump the law? Earlier this week, a new law went into effect in France giving employees the legal right to unplug. The law requires companies with more than 50 employees to establish hours when employees are not required to answer email. As we get more and more attached to our smartphones, tablets, and even our watches, the lines of business hours and expected availability will only continue to get blurrier. Below is Tribe’s take on the new regulation. Similar to non-exempt laws in the US restricting off-the-clock work for some types of employees, this law could be a launching pad for tighter restrictions across the board.

We’re curious to see if the law will actually work. It will take some time to determine significant impacts, but acceptance of these behaviors will rely heavily on individual company culture and direct manager-to-employee relationships. Instituting change in an established culture can be a daunting task, but certainly doable with the right communication and executive buy-in. It will be interesting to see if legal action accelerates these changes in behaviors.

A less stressed workforce can result in lower healthcare costs. Email overload, whether received day or night, has been reported as a significant source of workplace stress. As NPR highlighted, a group of Stanford business professors have estimated that work-related stress added between $125 and $190 billion dollars per year to America’s healthcare costs, amounting to between five and eight percent of total costs. Overwork accounted for $48 billion of that.

Decreased burnout can equate to higher engagement. With hopes of being more than just a ban on after-hours emails, the law anticipates making a real impact on work-life balance. The ability to unplug and detach from work-related responsibility could positively impact morale, engagement and productivity. Time will tell if other countries will join the movement, or if France will remain a lone trailblazer.

Interested in improving your culture’s work-life balance? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

How to Turn Post-Meeting Behaviors into a Productive Culture

It’s not about the meeting. It’s about what happens after. Establishing a culture of being productive before, during and after meetings can work wonders on efficiency. In this post, we’ll cover the behaviors that should immediately follow the meeting.

Encourage smart scheduling. Meeting times and scheduling can help or destroy productivity. We understand that calendars get booked and squeezing in those one-hour meetings can be the only way to move things forward. But instead of blocking calendars full and tackling the to-dos later, establish a culture of shorter meetings to leave time for the important steps that should follow immediately after. Tribe recommends scheduling 50 minute meetings instead of the traditional – and often default – 60 minutes. Getting those precious 10 minutes back to regroup and establish next steps can vastly improve output.

Capture action items. A great meeting just wrapped with a lot of deliverables for multiple parties. Instead of letting those tedious scribbles collect in a notebook, encourage employees to immediately record action items to get their team to the next milestone. At Tribe, we use Action Cards, a great low-tech solution that works well for us. Our Action Cards include due dates, details and the person responsible, taking the guess work out of what’s next.

Communicating decisions. The act of making decisions while in a meeting is as triumphant as important, but what’s next? Communicating the news of decisions to the appropriate person or team is just as significant as making the decision itself. Just as there should be clarity about who’s in charge of capturing the action items, make sure your post-meeting communicators know their responsibility in keeping everyone on the same page.

Interested in developing your productive culture? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

Four Tips to Launch an Effective Ambassador Program

You’ve got an important initiative, big organizational change or great new communications channel. Now what? In most cases the next step is to start producing news and information to keep employees informed. Establishing a successful internal communications platform like a well-rounded intranet, newsletter or digital signage is great, but having internal resources throughout the company will keep you on track for success.

Tribe recommends an ambassador program. From gathering and editing content, to providing a face-to-face internal voice and guidance among employees, a team of ambassadors can take your communications efforts to the next level. Here are four of our suggested tips for a successful ambassador program launch.

  1. Recruit the right team. A program of ambassadors positioned throughout the company can be a natural source of support across functional silos, business units or geographically locations. However, the right employee is key. A successful ambassador is often a more junior employee eager to make a name for themselves. Energy level can be more important than experience.
  1. Spread the word. Tribe usually recommends an announcement from management to reveal their team’s new ambassadors. Communicating the news of the new ambassadors will have two purposes: letting employees know who they should go to with their questions, concerns and relevant content, while also giving the ambassador the recognition they deserve.
  1. Provide the tools they need to be successful. Before ambassadors can become successful representatives, they will need some guidance. Introducing training tools like FAQs, conversation starters, and resources for connecting with each other to share best practices will go a long way in the successful launch and longevity of your program.
  1. Emphasize the WIIFM factor. The role of ambassador often adds to the workload, so clearly outlining what’s in it for them is important. Good news for you, becoming an ambassador is a great opportunity for employees. Not only will they have the chance to stretch beyond their current job descriptions, they will be able to connect and learn from some of the people doing the most important work in the company.

Need help getting your ambassador program off the ground? Tribe would love to help.

 

Brittany Walker

3 Tips for a Successful Culture Magazine

Culture magazines are a great resource for communicating across a multitude of functions and geography. Internal magazines are opportunities to bridge silos, create shared pride and boost recognition, all of which contribute to higher employee engagement.

At Tribe, we’ve created culture magazines for clients across industries ranging from consumer products to aviation to fashion. Especially in manufacturing, retail and other non-desk populations, magazines enable the company to make these frontline employees visible and even recognized as heroes throughout the organization.

Often produced as a quarterly publication, culture magazines don’t have to be a daunting or budget-busting. Here are three simple tips to keep your magazine on track.

  1. Develop an editorial plan. Establishing reoccurring topics and themes for each issue will take a load off the planning process at the beginning of each issue. Think through your messaging and communication goals for the publication, and be sure to work each of them into the plan. Allow for flexibility by including a feature story, but we would recommend at least three basics, like employee spotlights, leadership Q&A or wellness and volunteerism updates.
  1. Appoint an editorial board. This simple task has been a life-saver in ongoing magazines Tribe has produced in the past. At the start of each new issue, gather your established team composed of people from across different segments of the organization. All it takes is one organized conference call to discuss potential stories and features for the upcoming issue. By the time the call ends, you should have your identified editorial plan for the next issue, and the correct contacts to start producing the content.
  1. Keep revisions to a minimum. For best, and most efficient results, collaborate on the front end of the magazine, not the back end. A large part of this helpful hint is cutting down on the number of reviewers themselves. Once the articles are written and the issue is put into design, keep the circle as tight as possible. Multiple rounds of revisions can do damage to your timeline, and as a result, impact the budget.

Interested in developing a culture magazine? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

Three easy ways to improve your intranet

Your company’s intranet should be a reflection of its culture. Culture is not only about your mission, vision, values, logo and formal rituals, but it also includes employee beliefs about the company, myths and ancillary symbols that develop over time. Reviewing your intranet should shed some light on the intangible areas of your company’s culture. Analyzing your site doesn’t need to be a formal process, but by taking some time and reviewing a few basic elements, you will also gain a better understanding of your culture.

1. Site design should be reflective of your external brand and your desired internal culture.  Look at the design element of your internet and intranet.  Are they of the same quality? Do they look similar?  Does it appear that the company invested in both? Does your intranet reflect your desired culture in terms of being fun or potentially a more formal culture? If the answer to some of these questions is no, it may be a good time to improve the design.

2. If work/life balance is something your company values, give employees the opportunity to share information about their personality on the site. Rich employee profiles are a great way for employees to connect on a more personal level and improve their working relationships with co-workers. The underlying message that employees will receive is that the company cares about them as individuals, not just for the skill set they bring to the company.

3. Review your values, culture attributes and other brand elements to see if they are reflected in the site. Your intranet is a great tool to communicate and sustain elements of your brand, which in turn help develop your culture.  Look for interactive ways such as spotlighting employees that live your values or promoting events on the site that help build camaraderie.

Do you have other ideas of how to analyze your intranet for insights on your culture?  Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

4 Ways to Increase Engagement Through Employee Recognition

HiResEngaged employees are more likely to know that their role contributes to the overall success of the organization. When it comes to instilling that message throughout the company, Tribe often recommends a rewards and recognition program. From dedicated website portals, to a verbal “thank you,” there are many effective methods to increase confidence and morale through acknowledgment. Sometimes the smallest thing someone does can make the biggest difference for someone else.

  1. Verbally recognize standout employees during a regular meeting. Rewarding employees in front of their peers puts a little extra oomph in fostering pride. Schedule a few minutes into the agenda of your weekly or monthly meeting to spotlight an individual who deserves it.
  1. Establish a recognition item that can be passed on to others. The actual item can be determined by your culture – at Tribe we use a large jar – but the concept stays the same. Starting with the team leader, give it to someone who’s gone above and beyond. That person will keep the item for a month or quarter, and then pass it on to someone else on the team that deserves the spotlight for their accomplishments. It is important to let them know why they’re receiving the item, to set a standard for a job well done.
  1. Provide a sought-after treat to recognize employees’ contributions. This could be as simple as a quarterly breakfast with leadership, or a small gift or collectable token. The ability to attend an exclusive event or receive a keepsake can go a long way to make employees feel appreciated.
  1. Spotlight outstanding employees with a story of their accomplishments. Consider establishing an “employee of the month” program or a spotlight section in your newsletter or internal publication. Not only will it make that employee feel recognized for their contributions, but it will allow other employees to read why that person was selected and set their sights on how to be nominated in the future. It was also serve as a great reminder of your organization’s best practices.

Interested in developing a rewards and recognition program? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

3 Tips to Balance Print vs. Digital Communications

Many communicators have an option on high vs. low-tech solutions. Should we print? Or should we go digital? Tribe often recommends a mix of both. Especially within the same campaign. Providing messaging through multiple channels can increase the opportunity for engagement while reinforcing the communication at the same time.

Don’t always be so quick to rule out print. At Tribe, we often include print publications in our communication plans for clients, partly because employees receive so much digital communication. Print now breaks through just by being a different medium. Additionally, for communications intended to inspire company pride, communicate vision and share values, there’s something powerful about the relative permanence of print. People like to be able to hold the physical piece.

Digital has its advantages as well. A huge majority of employees technology daily in their everyday lives, even while they’re away from the office. Embedding printed pieces into a website, app or even on the company intranet gives employees the opportunity to reference materials whenever they want. Aside from convenience, there are many other benefits like analytic reports, adding music and photo galleries, embedding videos and more.

Reach different employee demographics. Millennials may be more likely to access an internal magazine from iPads and smartphones. Generation X and Boomers might prefer to view on their laptops or reach for a printed piece. Giving your employees flexibility and increasing convenience shows respect for them as individuals.

Interested in finding a balance of print and digital for your internal communications? Tribe can help.

Brittany Walker

What’s in it for Me: 3 Ways to Incentivize Employee Engagement

67857321_thumbnailThink you can’t buy employee engagement? Think again. Even while being cost-conscious there are plenty of ways to increase engagement by enticing your employees. Bringing the WIIFM factor to light, here are three ways to increase engagement through incentives.

1.  Hook them with a prize they actually want. Bringing an enter-to-win activation to an employee request can have a big result without a lot of cost. Prizes can range from a free lunch, to gift cards, to high-end electronics, to all-inclusive trips, all while having a big impact. When asking an employee to take time out of their busy day to pay attention to corporate communications, it helps to have a hook.

2.  Make them work for it. Scavenger hunts are a popular engagement method activated by Tribe, particularly when launching new intranets. Sounds elementary, but the concept of having employees find the information we’re communicating on their own is a great method for comprehension. It’s also a great way to build habits of using specific communication tools to find information. Getting them there is often half the battle, and when getting them there has a potential return, it’s a win-win.

3.  The way to the heart is through the stomach. Or at least food gives them a reason to show up at an event. Using food as an incentive is one of the oldest tricks in the book and absolutely applies when it comes to employee engagement. Especially while encouraging social activity, as food tends to do.

Building the groundwork doesn’t have to come at a huge price. Whether it be an employee survey, intranet launch or new initiative rollout, Tribe often promotes using bait to get them there. “If we build it, they will come” only applies in the movies. It’s up to us as communicators to get them there.

Interesting in improving your employee engagement activation? Tribe can help.