Four channels for CEO communications

Don’t assume a blog is the answer. If your CEO wants to commit to writing his or her own blog on a consistent basis over the long term, say weekly or at least monthly, that’s great. If not, look at other options — but not the option of having someone else write a blog under the CEO’s name.

A ghostwritten CEO blog is worse than no blog at all. Employees smell fake a mile away. Fake is the enemy of authentic, and authentic is what you want in leadership communications.

There are of course, a few rare exceptions. If the ghostwriter works extremely closely with the CEO and has heard him or her talk on the relevant topics often enough to nearly parrot the wording, that can work. But otherwise, ghostwriting you can undermine any equity you’ve built in authentic communications.

The goal of leadership communications is two-fold. The first is to share important messaging and information with employees in a way that keeps them in the loop on where the company is heading. The second is to build a human connection with the CEO and create trust in company management.

So what do you do if your CEO doesn’t have time to write his or her own blog?
There are plenty of other ways to share with employees what the CEO is thinking without a huge chunk of time out of that executive calendar.

1. Article based on a CEO interview: We regularly write employee newsletter and magazine articles based on short telephone interviews with CEOs. We generally book no more than 20 minutes for the call and try to keep it under that. Some CEOs prefer to have prepared questions they can review ahead of time; others are comfortable talking on the fly.

How is this different from a blog? It’s written in the third person, with quotes from the CEO peppered throughout the article. It’s about a conversation with the CEO, rather than pretending it was written by the CEO.

2. Video of the CEO: The most efficient way to pull this off, especially from the CEO’s point of view, is to shoot a number of videos in one session. It also helps to include more members of the leadership team, so that the CEO doesn’t have to do all the talking. Plus the viewers get the benefit of a watching several people rather than one talking head.

Material for eight or ten videos can be shot in one day, if you can plan content that far in advance. We generally ask for 45 minutes on the CEO’s calendar and maybe 20 or 30 minutes with other members of the executive team.

3. Audio: Some people are just not comfortable on camera, and if that’s the case for your CEO, don’t push it. You could suggest a podcast, for instance, to be housed on your intranet. There are also platforms with which the CEO could record a message for employees that they can hear by dialing a toll-free number. At the end of the CEO’s comments, there’s an option for them to leave their own comments or questions, so it becomes a format for two-way communication.

4. Quotations: This one seems almost too easy, but sometimes less really is more. The format can be digital signage, email, an internet feature or any other visual channel. Use a photo of the CEO and a one-sentence quote. We often pull these quotes from interviews for articles or from videos, but you also can ask your CEO to create quotes specifically for this channel. For instance, if there’s a new initiative underway, you might ask for a comment on why it’s so important to the business. If there’s an internal push for a more customer-centric approach, or more innovation, or increased collaboration, or even reduced spending, perhaps the CEO can give you a one-sentence blurb on that.

Interested in finding the right channel for your CEO communications?
Tribe can help.

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